Archives for posts with tag: CivilSociety

map-indonesia-west

Hallmarks of a democratic and free society include freedom of expression, association, and religion.  The proposed Bill on Mass Organizations by the Indonesian Government is cause for concern and has drawn criticism from United Nations independent experts and calls for its amendment.

UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and of Association, Maina Kiai, noted that the proposed bill runs counter to a flourishing civil society.  “The State must ensure that any restriction on the rights to freedom of association, expression, and religion is necessary in a democratic society, proportionate to the aim pursued, and does not harm the principles of pluralism, tolerance and broadmindedness.”

The proposed bill would include greater permit regulations for foreign organizations, and are a concern for legitimate civil society human rights work, and  for organization watchdog activities on corruption and bad government practices.

Coincidentally, this report coincides with World Inter-Faith Harmony Week.  At a special event at UN Headquarters:  “All of the world’s great religions share the values of peace, human dignity and respect for others,” said Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson.  “With dialogue, we can combat hate. With inter-faith harmony, we can build bridges to a better future.”

UN News Centre Sources

A group of United Nations independent experts today called on the Government of Indonesia to amend a bill that requires new organizations to adhere to the official State philosophy that supports the belief in only one God and imposes restrictions on the types of activities they can carry out.

Under the Bill on Mass Organizations, new associations must not be in contradiction with Pancasila – the official State philosophy that consecrates the belief ‘in the One and Only God’. It also stipulates that organizations have the duty to maintain religious values.

The Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief, Heiner Bielefeldt, said the legislation violates these freedoms and clarified that freedom of religion also applies to non-theistic and atheistic convictions.

The bill also restricts the types of activities that associations can carry out, and bans those activities which ‘endanger the unity and safety’ of Indonesia, as well as those which are the duty of law enforcers and Government. This last one could prevent organizations from uncovering instances of bad governance, such as corruption cases.

“Associations should be free to determine their statutes, structures and activities and to make decisions without State interference,” Mr. Kiai pointed out, warning that the bill threatens associations with burdensome administrative requirements.

If the bill is passed, the Government will be able to oversee the administration of associations through an information system. Foreign organizations will face the same restrictions, but will also need to obtain a permit to operate in the country, and foreign nationals who want to start an association will have to have lived in the country for at least seven consecutive years and place over $1 million of their personal wealth in the association.

“The use of such a system could infringe on the autonomy of civil society organizations and on their rights to privacy and freedom of expression,” said the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the rights to freedom of opinion and expression, Frank La Rue.

The bill, which is due to be voted on later this week, also stipulates that the Government may suspend associations without obtaining a prior court order. “Let me stress that suspension of associations should only be sanctioned by an impartial and independent court in case of a clear and imminent danger resulting in a flagrant violation of domestic laws, in compliance with international human rights law,” stated Mr. Kiai.

The Special Rapporteurs said they stand ready to provide technical assistance to Indonesia to ensure the bill meets international law standards. Special rapporteurs are appointed by the UN Human Rights Council to examine and report back on a country situation or a specific human rights theme. The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work.

Susan Sacirbey

Facebook Become a Friend: “Susan Sacirbey”

TWITTER:  Follow us @DiplomaticallyX

PHOTO: Courtesy of wissenladen.de

Advertisements

Blog Report: ALGERIA – RESTRICTIONS & IMPEDIMENTS ON CIVIL SOCIETY, By Ambassador Mo
“While recognizing driving force behind this state of affairs is rooted in security concerns, I encourage Government to review laws & practices relating to civil society organizations & freedom of assembly, & to order all security forces to refrain from violating internationally recognized instruments guaranteeing right to freedom of association,” is summary of UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, at conclusion of visit to Algeria.
http://diplomaticallyincorrect.org/blog_post/algeria-restrictions-impediments-on-civil-society/56354Image

Blog Report: RUSSIA RESTRICTIVE LAW ADVERSELY IMPACTS CIVIL SOCIETY, By Ambassador Mo
“These amendments constitute direct affront to those wishing to freely exercise their right to freedom of association,” UN Special Rapporteur on rights to freedom of peaceful assembly & of association, Maina Kiai, said (joined in his concern criticism by 2 other UN Human Rights Rapporteurs). Dismayed at Russian Government’s plans to unduly restrict access to foreign funding for civil society.” –More–
http://diplomaticallyincorrect.org/blog_post/russia-restrictive-law-adversely-impacts-civil-society/54814Image

Blog Report: RIO+20 – FAILURE OR SUCCESS, By Ambassador Mo
“The speeches are over. Now the work begins. Rio+20 has affirmed fundamental principles – renewed essential commitments – & given us new direction. From governments to the world’s biggest companies, from philanthropic organizations to youth volunteers, they are part of a growing global movement for change.” The above assessment from UNSG Ban Ki-moon implies a positive foundation. –More–
http://diplomaticallyincorrect.org/blog_post/rio20-failure-or-success/54479Image

ECOLOGY-DIPLOMAT Blog Report: RIO +20 LACK OF PROGRESS FRUSTRATES CIVIL SOCIETY, By AMBASSADOR MO
The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD), “Rio+20,” will take place in Brazil on 20-22 June 2012.  World political leaders, along with thousands of participants from governments, the private sector, NGOs & other groups, will presumably conclude negotiations on a final document with clear steps to reduce poverty, advance social equity & ensure environmental protection.
http://diplomaticallyincorrect.org/blog_post/rio20-lack-of-progress-frustrates-civil-society/51702Image

Blog Report: FROM ETHIOPIA TO VENEZUELA CIVIL SOCIETY UNDER ASSAULT, By Ambassador Mo
“Civil society – including NGOs, trade unions, human rights defenders, academics, journalists, bloggers & others – plays an absolutely crucial role in ensuring that human rights are protected in individual states,” said the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay. –MORE– for Some Countries Spotlighted —
http://diplomaticallyincorrect.org/blog_post/from-ethiopia-to-venezuela-civil-society-under-assault/51189Image

Blog Report: JUSTICE/CIVIL SOCIETY IN MUSLIM WORLD, By Susan Sacirbey

Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey will speak Wednesday (April 18, 2012) at Montclair State University in New Jersey as part of month long program on “Justice and Civil Society in the Muslim World.” Muhamed “Mo” will be part of panel on “The Arts & Culture as Forces in Social Change” in the Muslim/political/diplomatic context. –More–

http://diplomaticallyincorrect.org/blog_post/justicecivil-society-in-muslim-world/50618Image