Archives for posts with tag: biodiversity

By, Ambassador Muhamed Sacirbey with Susan Sacirbey contributing
The diplomat-artist is not just in the form of the personality of the Goodwill Ambassador but also the vision and presentation of the avant-garde of global citizens: Once you are in the water you’ll discover it is more than a pool but a sea of change. –Read MORE–
http://diplomatartist.com/un-tv-production-technology-of-diplomat-artist/

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By, Susan Sacirbey via DiplomatArtist.com
The Indigenous have much to teach us. Respect and honor for their way of life will be the building blocks for a more sustainable future. Our lives depend on each other. — MORE —
From Susan Sacirbey via Diplomat Artist Buzz
When the future of the planet is a lot more than a photo-op for inter-species existence & survival for man, pandas, and dogs. — Read MORE & Imagine
Protect World Wildlife Today, 3 March, & Forever
From Susan Sacirbey & Diplomat Artist
Just as “it takes a village” to raise our children, so too does it take an educated global citizen — the entire world — to protect and preserve World Wildlife. — More —

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Are Animals Global Citizens?
Susan Sacirbey collaborating w/ Ambassador Muhamed (Mo) Sacirbey via Huffington Post
Perhaps you have one predominant thought in back of your mind as you read this blog: Why should we expect any more global consensus on addressing animal welfare when the international community is failing on so many conflicts to deliver peace or even secure human rights? –MORE–
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/susan-sacirbey/are-animals-global-citize_b_7628452.html

“Family farming is based on tradition, & forms social fabric of many societies playing a key role in protecting world’s biodiversity & promoting sustainable use of natural resources.” UN expert also underlined crucial role played by women in agricultural development, noting some 43% of agricultural labour force in developing countries is female.

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=49089#.VEAFm-eBG2k

In early Spring I post a family portrait of a pair of Mute Swans & their two cygnets. Lost track of the cygnets & assumed that snapping turtles got them. However, yesterday this is what I saw. Either we have a unique case of biodiversity or those grey/brown swans with black beaks are juvenile swans grown up from cygnets. What do you believe? Inquiring minds want to know … Susan and Ambassador MoIMG_7053